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The Father of English Hymns

Isaac Watts was an odd little eighteenth-century Christian whose classic poems like O God Our Help in Ages Past, I Sing the Mighty Power of God, When I Survey the Wondrous Cross, At the Cross (and 600 others!) have earned him the title the “Father of English Hymns.” He was born amid persecution. His father was a nonconformist deacon who was sometimes jailed for his faith, and one such incident caused Mrs. Watts to prematurely give birth to stunted little Isaac.
But young Watts developed a strong spirit. When as a teenager he grumbled about the music in his church, his father told him to write his own songs if he thought he could do better than King David. So he did. His new-fangled hymns were met with resistance, but he pressed on.

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Thy Kingdom Come

Many people who think they’re Kingdom citizens will someday be shocked to discover they aren’t. In Matthew 7:21 Jesus says, “Not everyone who says to Me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven; but he who does the will of My Father who is in heaven.” Some people think highly of the Kingdom but never receive the King. They call Jesus “Lord” but don’t do His will. Lip service won’t do. You must receive the King and His Kingdom (John 1:12).

MacArthur, J. F., Jr. (1993). Drawing Near—Daily Readings for a Deeper Faith (p. 93). Wheaton, IL: Crossway Books.

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What are you living for?

What are you living for? Is there a place in your life where your little kingdom purposes have been masquerading as the kingdom of God? What in your life right now really excites you? What things do you find fulfilling and satisfying? What has become your treasure, and how do you define your needs? Is there a place where selfishness wears the mask of godliness? Is your little kingdom so well costumed that no one around you would ever recognize it for what it really is?

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